Business Development Training -Rainmaking: 10 Questions to start off your client meetings

We have said before that well constructed,  open questions can help us to find out what’s going on for our clients.
They can connect us with buyers, understand their needs and what’s important to them. All of this makes our job of trying to help them a little easier.

On our Business Development Training workshops we give out pages and pages of sample questions for the attendees to start their own library…
We’re not going to do that now but here are a 10 Questions that might start off your collection.

10 Open Questions

  1. Is there a particular reason as to why this particular service or product is not working for you right now?
  2. Many of our clients are reporting problems with areas A, B, and C and asking us to help.
    How are these areas affecting you?
    What do you think about them?
  3. What are your overall goals and objectives for this area?
  4. What obstacles are holding you back from reaching your profit, or other goals?
  5. (If it was your client who asked for the meeting)
    Can you tell me more about the reasons you want to talk with me today?
  6. (Assuming you set the meeting)
    As I said in my email, I’d like to share with you a few ideas that have helped our clients succeed in the X,Y, and Z areas.
    However before I launch into those I’d like to know what else might you like to cover?
    What will make the meeting successful for you?
  7. If you were to make this happen, what would it mean for you personally?
  8. How important to the board of directors is this initiative?
  9. Wave your magic wand and it’s 3 years from now, how will this look different?
  10. Wave your wand again … There were no restrictions on you – money, effort, political issues and so on do not exist
    What would you change?  Can you tell me why you say that?

Sometimes when you have really thought out your questions it can be difficult to not sound contrived. Make sure you use your own words and  wording when you ask these questions.
The words have to feel comfortable to you when they come out of your mouth. Practicing in front of a mirror can help.

If you or your sales team need help with Questioning and Listening to the answers email us on info@rainmaker-coaching.co.uk

Good Rainmaking
Rob

 

Business Development Training -Rainmaking: 7 Rapport gaining Questions

Our recommendation is that before you start to sell yourself, you develop Rapport with your new prospective client.

Rapport is that slightly mysterious feeling when you seem to be getting on really well with someone

We show our Business Development Training workshop attendees techniques to get to Rapport quickly …

We ask them to go into their first meeting with a new person with a mind-set of…
“I have two areas of common ground with this person .
I just don’t know what they are yet and I’d like to find out. ”

Sometimes  one really well thought out open-ended question and your client will share with you all the information you need to find the areas of common ground and begin to help them.

Well thought out, open-ended sales questions help us find out what’s going on in our prospects’ worlds.
They help us connect with buyers personally, understand their needs and what’s important to them, and help them create better futures.

Following are a few open-ended sales questions you can ask.
We think they’ll help you to fill in the picture of your clients’ needs.

One thing you’ll already know about open-ended sales questions:
They don’t need to be complex. Often the basics are all you need.

Sample questions

  1. What’s going on in your business these days?
  2. How have things changed over the last few years / months?
  3. How do you expect them to change in the next few years / months?
  4. What are you up to this weekend?
  5. Where are you from?
  6. It was good to hear the short version of your background at the meeting.
    However I’m interested in the long version. How about we grab a coffee somewhere?
  7. You mentioned you want to retire in a few years. What are you thinking of doing then?

If you are looking to generate rapport you do have to show genuine interest in your prospects.

These short questions will set you on your way.

Good Rainmaking

Rob Biggin

 

Business Development Training -Rainmaking: 7 Rapport gaining Questions

Our recommendation is that before you start to sell yourself, you develop Rapport with your new prospective client.

Rapport is that slightly mysterious feeling when you seem to be getting on really well with someone

We show our Business Development Training workshop attendees techniques to get to Rapport quickly …

We ask them to go into their first meeting with a new person with a mind-set of…
“I have two areas of common ground with this person .
I just don’t know what they are yet and I’d like to find out. ”

Sometimes  one really well thought out open-ended question and your client will share with you all the information you need to find the areas of common ground and begin to help them.

Well thought out, open-ended sales questions help us find out what’s going on in our prospects’ worlds.
They help us connect with buyers personally, understand their needs and what’s important to them, and help them create better futures.

Following are a few open-ended sales questions you can ask.
We think they’ll help you to fill in the picture of your clients’ needs.

One thing you’ll already know about open-ended sales questions:
They don’t need to be complex. Often the basics are all you need.

Sample questions

  1. What’s going on in your business these days?
  2. How have things changed over the last few years / months?
  3. How do you expect them to change in the next few years / months?
  4. What are you up to this weekend?
  5. Where are you from?
  6. It was good to hear the short version of your background at the meeting.
    However I’m interested in the long version. How about we grab a coffee somewhere?
  7. You mentioned you want to retire in a few years. What are you thinking of doing then?

If you are looking to generate rapport you do have to show genuine interest in your prospects.

These short questions will set you on your way.

Good Rainmaking

Rob Biggin

 

Interviewer Skills Training: The perils of Interviewing “from the hip”

Do your managers rock up to the Interview with no preparation and proceed to interview candidates?

Does it feel a little like  “Shooting from the hip” .

Is asking random interview questions “on the fly”, taking no notes and making a snap decision, basically what goes on at your place of work?

Are candidates rejected for having “No Sparkle”…

(Our Interviewer Skills Training Workshop might help here)

You may need to publicise an article from the Business Doctor in the Sunday Times 9th June to them.

The question posed was
” A Candidate who failed to get a job claims I discriminated against her because of her age. How do I defend my case? I thought only employees could take you to a tribunal”

The answer came  from Kingston Smith LLP written by Peter Done MD of Peninsula.
and is summarised below …

“Legislation that protects individuals from being discriminated against extends to job applicants as well as employees.
This means that not only must employers treat their employees fairly…
they must extend fair treatment to everyone who applies for a job.

This woman could have a point.
You need to rebut her allegations by showing her that your decision to not employ her was based on merit.”

What’s Rainmaker’s view of how you can do this?

If you have attended the Rainmaker Interviewer Skills Workshop you will know that there is really only one way to do this.

  • Have a good paper trail to show her
    • An interview rating form including your notes on how you graded all the candidates
    • OR a general set of notes reflecting how each individual performed
    • Or Documentation showing that the individual you selected was the better candidate based on merit

If you’d like to see how easily (and cheaply) you can put this in place in your business call or email info@rainmaker-coaching.co.uk

What are the consequences of not being able to produce this evidence ?

  • Be open to allegations of unfair treatment from people who are interviewed for a living
  • Potentially being sued (as one of our clients was )
  • Having to pay legal fees and costs awarded in favour of the candidate you allegedly treated unfairly and discriminated against.
  • Face out of court settlements of many thousands of pounds to protect your name and reputation

If you want to avoid all of this email us at info@rainmaker-coaching.co.uk and ask about Interviewer Skills workshop

 

 

 

Performance Management Training: Rapid Skill Acquisition

So you have a scenario in your place of work: You need to have a group of people change.

They have to begin to deliver a different type of service or deliver it in a different way.

They have to behave differently.      They have to learn new skills.

AND they have to do it QUICKLY …

How can you help them?

Here are a few ideas based on the book from Josh Kaufman :
The first 20 hours :How to learn anything fast: 

  • Choose a loveable project
    • If you are excited by a project you’ll want to acquire the skill
    • You naturally acquire skills that you care about
  • Focus your energy on ONE skill at a time
    • If not you’ll spend too much time switching
    • Don’t give up on other skills you want to acquire, just save them for later
  • Define your target performance level
    • Start with a low target and reset the target when you reach it.
    • If you want to run cross-country start with a small country
  • Deconstruct the skill into subskills
    • You don’t have to practice everything all the time
    • Get very good at one sub-skill and then build
  • Obtain Critical tools
    • Get ALL the RIGHT tools you need before you start
  • Eliminate Barriers to practice
    • Tools not available
    • Distractions in the environment
    • Emotional blocks
    • Too much effort involved to practice
  • Create fast feedback loop
    • Get a coach to help (your manager)
    • Buddy up with someone who can give you honest feedback
  • Make dedicated time for practice
    • Log where you spend your time for a few days
    • Find 90 minutes of low value time per day and use that to practice
    • Practice for 20 hours then reflect on progress
  • Practice by the clock in short bursts
    • Set a timer and practice for 20 minutes
    •          3 to 5 times a day
    • Practice until the timer goes off
  • Emphasise quantity and speed
    • Practice as much as you can at a “good enough” level rather than strive for perfection
    • The faster and more often you practice the more rapidly you’ll acquire the skill.

And if you want to hear from Josh himself here’s a 20 minute video on YouTube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5MgBikgcWnY&feature=player_embedded

If you’d like any assistance to help people change behaviours and acquire new skills please call or email
info@rainmaker-coaching.co.uk